Are You at Risk of Prostate Cancer?


Prostate cancer mainly affects men over the age of 50. However, if you have serious concerns that you may be affected your concerns should not go unheeded.

Prostate Cancer Infographic

Age is a Consideration

70 and 74 is the average age that men are diagnosed with prostate cancer according to Prostate Cancer UK. Age is a major factor in developing prostate cancer however, there are other factors that may affect your vulnerability.

If you have close family members who have breast cancer, a relative who was under 60 when they were diagnosed with prostate cancer or your father or brother was diagnosed your chances of developing the condition are increased.

42 Year Old Diagnosed

Although misdiagnosis of prostate cancer due to age is quite rare, that does not mean it doesn't happen. We worked with a 42 year old father who was diagnosed with the condition after holidaying in Tunisia. He was taken to hospital whilst there and was diagnosed with an enlarged prostate. Although an enlarged prostate is not an indication of cancer, he was advised to seek medical attention when he returned home to the UK.

Doctors here dismissed the earlier diagnosis claiming he was too young to suffer from this form of cancer. 11 months later, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer after an examination and biopsy.

The hospital in which is diagnosis was delayed, Royal Blackburn Hospital, said they did all they could to get to the bottom of his symptoms. They commented that they performed extensive tests and many signs pointed them away from the possibility of cancer. When he was finally diagnosed, he was told he had approximately 8 months to live.

Although they believe they did all they could, if you are concerned that you may have prostate cancer you should pursue all tests that are available. If you are denied these tests and you are later diagnosed with prostate cancer, you should consider taking legal action for your misdiagnosis.

To find out how we could help you please make a no-obligation enquiry or call freephone: 0808 129 3320.

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