CWU Member wins £5,000 compensation for Lacerated Finger

Dated:   

Aiden Clarke, a CWU (Communication Works Union) postal worker has won £5,000 in compensation after suffering from a lacerated finger whilst at work.

Postal Worker

Faulty Letter box causes Lacerated Finger


The 51 year old postal worker was out delivering mail to a property. As he pushed the mail through a the letter box a metal flap suddenly came down, causing him to suffer a laceration to his finger.

Aiden's injury was so severe that he immediately went to A&E where he received stitches to his finger. His wound was dressed and he was given a sling. Aiden also had to make 3 visits to his GP, where his stitches were removed and he was given a sick note for work.

He also had to see the GP for continuing pain and swelling, and was advised on which exercises to perform at home to help with this. As he found it painful to make a fist and was unable to bend his finger he was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon and for hand therapy.

As a result of his injury, Aiden found it difficult to perform household chores and had to take 2 weeks off work. When he returned to work he had to undertake modified duties for 2 months.

Compensation for Lacerated Finger


When Aiden and his manager inspected the letter box they found the wooden section in the middle of the letter box was missing. So the postal worker approached Simpson Millar LLP to take on his claim for compensation against the homeowners for his lacerated finger.

The homeowners admitted they were responsible for not repairing and maintaining their letter box. They were also responsible for not providing Aiden with an alternative place to deliver their post whilst their letter box was being repaired.

An offer was made of £5,000 which Mr Clarke accepted. This case demonstrates that homeowners are responsible for their property, including their letter box and should make all efforts to ensure their property is safe for visitors.


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