Don’t Get Sick In August As Black Wednesday Hits NHS Patients!

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The first Wednesday in August is the day when thousands of junior Doctors begin work in hospitals across the UK and many more change roles resulting in a significant increase in the mortality of emergency patients.

Research has shown that the influx of inexperienced staff leads to a 6% rise in patient death rates during the month of August.Research has shown that the influx of inexperienced staff leads to a 6% rise in patient death rates during the month of August.

Two years ago the NHS introduced a mentoring system to try to provide support to new Doctors in an attempt to improve safety during August, the first Wednesday of which, when junior Doctors traditionally start their new job, has been dubbed "black Wednesday".

the first Wednesday of which, when junior Doctors traditionally start their new job, has been dubbed black Wednesday

Junior Doctors are supposed to work with a senior colleague for 4 days before changeover day, to settle into their role before being expected to take on responsibility. With NHS Consultants already working at capacity and at weekends and with The Independent recently quoting one Consultant from the North West who speaks of "intense working patterns affecting health and life outside work" it is difficult to see how the NHS mentoring system can be providing adequate support to new Doctors in an attempt to improve safety during August.

A poll of junior Doctors already working in hospitals across the UK in 2014 found that 70% did not feel they have enough time to care for patients

A poll of junior Doctors already working in hospitals across the UK in 2014 found that 70% did not feel they have enough time to care for patients.

Half of 1,000 junior medics polled by the Medical Protection Society [MPS] said that they had concerns about quality of care in their workplace.

almost two thirds said they had difficulty with heavy workloads
Half of 1,000 junior medics polled by the Medical Protection Society [MPS] said that they had concerns about quality of care in their workplace.

1 in 20 junior medics said that they had been forced to have time off work due to stress

82% said they had struggled with long hours in the last year and almost two thirds said they had difficulty with heavy workloads. 1 in 20 junior medics said that they had been forced to have time off work due to stress.

If you are planning on taking part in any high risk activities this month, it might be worth thinking again!


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