Campaign to Prevent Naming of Revenge Porn Victims

Dated:
By
  

The Law Of... protecting the innocent

The Police and Crime Commissioner for North Yorkshire has called for an urgent change in the law to prevent the naming of revenge porn victims. Emma Pearmaine, Director of Family Services with Simpson Millar, takes a look at the #NoMoreNaming campaign.

Campaign to Prevent Naming of Revenge Porn Victims

A 21st Century Crime

The digital revolution has brought about many beneficial changes to both our work and social lives, making it easier to connect, share information and get the most from our day to day pursuits. But as with most good things, this has come at a cost for many.

So-called revenge porn has seen women from all walks of life – including school-age girls coaxed into uploading sexualised images of themselves – bullied, blackmailed and even publicly shamed on unsavoury websites.

It is a form of both harassment and abuse, and although the perpetrators of such crimes are open to prosecution under UK law, there is nothing in place to prevent the names of their victims being released and splashed across the media.

Shocking statistics seen on the Women's Equality website highlight the extent of the problem, revealing that:

  • 75-90% of the victims are female
  • 1 in 10 ex-partners have threatened to post naked images of exes online, with 60% carrying out the threat
  • 49% receive unwanted online attention from someone who has seen the material
  • 93% of victims suffer emotional distress as a result
  • Children as young as 11 have fallen victim to revenge porn

Adding insult to injury, it has also been revealed that since it became an offence in the UK to publish sexual images or videos of someone without their consent, 61% of reported cases have resulted in no further action.

Changing the Law

The campaign to grant anonymity to the victims of revenge porn has been launched by Keeley Richards-Shaw, herself a victim, and is supported by North Yorkshire's Police and Crime Commissioner, Julie Mulligan, along with the Women's Equality Party.

Leading with the hashtag #NoMoreNaming, it has strong support on social media, as well as gaining traction through other outlets, such as newspapers and an online petition with over 15,000 signatures.

Emma Pearmaine comments:

"The law states that the victim of a crime listed under the Sexual Offences Act of 1992 is entitled to a lifetime's anonymity. This means their name cannot be released to the general public through press reporting, with failure to abide by this a criminal act in itself. As revenge porn falls under the Criminal Justice and Courts Act of 2015, it is not subject to the same restrictions."

"This loophole clearly needs to be closed, as the sexual nature of the crime means that victims who are already emotionally distressed, who might've been blackmailed or publicly shamed as a consequence, will be reluctant to come forward for fear of further exposure by press reporting. It was for this reason that victims of other sexual offences were granted anonymity in the first place."

"This is a worthwhile campaign, rightly backed by the Women's Equality Party and a local Police and Crime Commissioner, and if successful it will hopefully give more women the courage needed to report these crimes, knowing that the support they need will be there."


To find out how we could help you please make a no-obligation enquiry or call freephone: 0808 129 3320.




News Archive


Get In Touch